Omgekomen gedeporteerden

Family Dunkelblau-Schwarz

Family Dunkelblau-Schwarz

Mejlech Dunkelblau and Ryfka Schwarz were both born in Rzeszów, Poland. Anna Dunkelblau was born on November 15, 1906. Mejlech and Ryfka lived unofficially separated. Mejlech was deported on transport XXIV from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau and was murdered there. Ryfka and Anna were not deported and survived the war.


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Family Lisak-Kaplan

Family Lisak-Kaplan

Moses Lisak and Esther Kaplan were born in Kalisz, Poland. They arrived in Belgium in January 1939 as a stopover to emigrate to Uruguay. On January 19, 1935, they had a daughter: Ruth. Moses and Lisak were deported on transport XXIII from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Ruth was not deported and survived the war.

Family Eijsman-Kaganowitsch

Family Eijsman-Kaganowitsch

Anna Kaganowitsch and Wolf Eijsman married in Maastricht on July 25, 1934. A year later, on May 6, 1935, they had their first and only child: Catherine. Anna and Catherine were deported from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau with transport XI and Wolf with transport XII. They did not survive the war.

Sonia Sor and Joseph Gordon

Sonia Sor and Joseph Gordon

Sonia Sor and Joseph Gordon married on November 18, 1933, in Ghent. The couple was registered in the Dossin Barracks on January 11, 1943, on the list of transport XIX. They were deported from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau where they were murdered.

Family Wyman-De Vrede

Family Wyman-De Vrede

Aaron Wyman and Rica de Vrede had one child: Isidore Isaac. Aaron and Rica were deported with transport XX to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Isidore received Belgian citizenship on February 8, 1939 but was deported on transport XXIIB. No one from the Wyman-De Vrede family survived the war.

Louis Alexander and Elisabeth Nykerk

Louis Alexander and Elisabeth Nykerk

Louis Alexander fled Germany in 1934. He married Elisabeth Nykerk in Schaerbeek on August 6, 1938. Louis was arrested in 1940 and deported to Perpignan in France. After his release, he was arrested again and deported with transport XXIV. Louis died in 1945 in Theresienstadt. Elisabeth presumably stayed in the Netherlands and survived.

Family Nejman-Kimel

Family Nejman-Kimel

Manijl Nejman and Masza Kimel had four children: Willy, Benjamin, Clara and Joseph. The whole Nejman-Kimel family was deported with transport XI from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Manijl was declared fit for work but died, as did his family.

Martin Kaufmann

Martin Kaufmann

Martin Kaufmann arrived in Belgium on a Kindertransport from Germany in 1939. He was placed in various orphanages by the Assistance Council for Jewish Refugees. Martin accepted the Arbeitseinsatzbefehl and was deported with transport I to Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was murdered.

Betty Marx and daughter Ruth Tobias

Betty Marx and daughter Ruth Tobias

Betty Marx and Moses Tobias were both born in Germany. They married and had one child: Ruth Tobias. After Betty and Moses divorced, Betty and her daughter Ruth moved to Belgium. They were arrested on September 11, 1942 during the third anti-Jewish raid in Antwerp. Betty and Ruth were deported and didn’t survive the war.

Karl Guenther

Karl Guenther

Karl Guenther fled Germany in fear of the persecution of Jews by the Gestapo. He received assistance from the Assistance Council for Jewish Refugees. Karl accepted the Arbeitseinsatzbefehl in August 1942 and was deported on transport III from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau. He did not survive the war.

Family Luxemberg-Grozwursel

Family Luxemberg-Grozwursel

Baruch Luxemberg and Laja Cwatla Grozwursel had four children: Dora, Regina, Celina and Suzanne. It is possible that Dora died before the war or lived abroad during the occupation. Baruch, Laja Cwatla, Regina, Celina and Suzanne were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau on different transports (II, XIV and XV).

Family Sluis-Zeelander

Family Sluis-Zeelander

Marcus Sluis was a diamond cutter and Adela Zeelander also came from a diamond worker family. Together they had three children: Sara, Clara and Filip. The Sluis-Zeelander family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau via different transports (III, IX and XXI). None of them survived the war.

Izraël Goldfarb

Izraël Goldfarb

Izrael Goldfarb was deported with transport XXIII to Auschwitz-Birkenau. He did not survive the war.

Family Aszmian-Szulanska

Family Aszmian-Szulanska

Lejb Aszmian and Doba Szulanska had three children: Abraham, Hersz and Lazare. Lejb died already in 1932. Abraham was not deported and Hersz went into hiding in France. Doba and Lazare were deported with a different transport to Auschwitz-Birkenau. They did not survive the war.

Sara Boeki

Sara Boeki

Sara Boeki was deported with her son Willy on transport XXIII from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Mother and son were murdered there.

Family Spirn-Stick

Family Spirn-Stick

The family Spirn-Stick was a large family consisting of father Leib Spirn, mother Ruchel Stick and their seven children: Gitel, Moses Chaksel, Laie, Bine Sara, Izaak, Esther and Hanna. Via transport XI and transport XX, the entire Spirn-Stick family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. None of them survived the war.

Gustav Abineri

Gustav Abineri

Gustav Abineri fled Germany and arrived in Belgium on August 26, 1938. He said he would stay in Belgium pending emigration abroad. Gustav was required to leave Belgium in 1940 but this could not take place due to health problems. He was deported with transport VIII to Auschwitz-Birkenau and did not survive the war.

Family Wahl-Keller

Family Wahl-Keller

The whole Wahl-Keller family, except from father Seinwel Hersz Wahl and daughter Lea, was deported from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. No one survived the deportation. Seinwel survived the war but died already in 1946.

Willem Kuit and Sophia Parijs

Willem Kuit and Sophia Parijs

Willem Kuit lived as a diamond worker alternately in Belgium and the Netherlands. In 1923 Willem married Sophia Paris and they both moved to Belgium. The couple was deported on different transports from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Willem on transport IX and Sophia on transport XI. They did not survive the war.

Family Kurier

Family Kurier

The Kurier family fled Austria for fear of persecution by the Gestapo. Mother Fryme Eisgrau died early in 1924. Father Hersch Kurier and his children Frederika, Jeannette and Regine were all deported from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. None of the Kurier family survived the war.

Family Rosen-Hochglober

Family Rosen-Hochglober

This family was strongly affected by the horrors of the Second World War.

Marianne Bradt

Marianne Bradt

Marianne was with two other friends active in a communist resistance group and tried to destabilise the Wehrmacht.

Family Borenchole-Landsberg

Family Borenchole-Landsberg

The Borenchole-Landsberg family was deported with transport XX from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Mother Fejga and daughter Thérèse were murdered. Their son, Salomon, was not deported and survived the war. Father Abraham Joseph survived his captivity in Auschwitz and came back to Belgium in 1945, together with Salomon.

Family Margulies-Mahler

Family Margulies-Mahler

The Margulies-Mahler family obtained the naturalization in 1926 which granted them Belgian citizenship. Anne, Jacques, Helena-Ella, Liliane and Armand were deported with transport XXIIB to Auschwitz-Birkenau. They were murdered. Georges Mahler went into hiding in Aarschot with his wife Selma Lichtmann and children Charles and Nanette. They were never arrested and survived World War II.

Family Fryling-Rozenes

Family Fryling-Rozenes

The Fryling-Rozenes family was arrested in the only major raid in Brussels during the night of 3 to 4 September 1942. Sender Bynem, Chaja Terna and their children Samuel and Claire were deported with transport IX from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. None of the family survived the war.

Family Zeelander-Barmhartigheid

Family Zeelander-Barmhartigheid

The Zeelander-Barmhartigheid family stayed alternately in Amsterdam and Antwerp. The family members were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau via various transports. None of the Zeelander-Barmhartigheid family survived the war.

Family de Groot-Winther

Family de Groot-Winther

Isaak and Emmy, both from the Netherlands, seek a better life in Belgium. However, they are gripped by the horror of anti-Semitism.

Family Bezem - Sperber

Family Bezem – Sperber

Malka Sperber’s father had health problems. Therefore the family came to Belgium. Mother and both sons accepted the Arbeitseinsatzbefehl, the employment order issued by the Sipo-SD. They were deported with transport V from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. They did not survive. The fate of father Abraham Broom is unknown to us.

Gertrude and Lipman Pakula

Gertrude and Lipman Pakula

Father Lipman and daughter Gertrude were expelled from Germany. They were both deported from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. They did not survive.

Family Kotas - Kacai

Family Kotas – Kacai

The Kotas – Kacai family were deported on a different transport from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. No one survived.

Family Rabstein- Hirzkovitsch

Family Rabstein- Hirzkovitsch

The family was committed to the Jewish community.

Family Fajbusiewicz- Abramowicz

Family Fajbusiewicz- Abramowicz

The family experienced many tragic events. Anti-Semitism eventually became fatal to them.

Chaim Miler

Chaim Miler

Chaim Miler came from a large family. He was deported on transport IX which stopped in Kosel. He got off and was selected for forced labor. Chaim died in Buchenwald a few months before the end of World War II.

Zelik Sztuden and Rosalie Luxberg

Zelik Sztuden and Rosalie Luxberg

Zelik Sztuden and Rosalie Luxberg were deported from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau where they were murdered. Both their children survived the war.

The family Klein-Thalheim

The family Klein-Thalheim

The family had great travel plans, but they were unable to fulfil them. Their daughter Nelly was an orphan during the war.

Family Pander - Lublinski

Family Pander – Lublinski

The Pander – Lublinski family consisted of mother, father, and daughter. No one of the family survived Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Camp doctor Fritz Basch

Camp doctor Fritz Basch

Although Fritz Basch was active as a camp doctor in the Dossin Barracks, he could not protect his family from deportation.

Family Wolff-Halpert

Family Wolff-Halpert

The Wolff-Halpert family hoped for a new life on the other side of the ocean, but arrived.

The Hollander-Herbst family

The Hollander-Herbst family

Having emigrated from Poland in 1929, the whole family settled in Antwerp. On 9 october 1942 the whole family was taken to the Dossin Barracks.  

The Langenauer - Badner family

The Langenauer – Badner family

Malka Badner, a Polish Jew, arrived in Belgium before the First World War, in 1912. Jozef Markus Langenauer arrived later. They had three children.

The Domb-Neugebohr family

The Domb-Neugebohr family

This family of Polish Jews fled from Germany to Belgium in 1939. The father, aged 47 when he was deported, worked as a commercial traveller. The mother, Ester Neugebohr, a 38-year-old housewife, looked after her three younger children with the help of her oldest daughter, Hilda Charlotte, 21.

Boris Averbruch

Boris Averbruch

Boris and his mother, Luba Lasowski, are arrested in their house at Montensstraat 64 during a major raid in Antwerp on the night of 28 to 29 August. His ties with the Jewish Association could no longer save him.

Salomon Seewald en Fradel Schenkel

Salomon Seewald en Fradel Schenkel

Polish-born Salomon Seewald came to Belgium in 1924. Fradel Schenkel, whom he married in Belgium, also came from Poland. Salomon Seewald earned his living as a trader. He and his wife signed the Jewish register in Antwerp in December 1940, but moved to Profondeville in de Province of Namur in January 1941 before restrictions were…

The Nirenberg-Karpman family

The Nirenberg-Karpman family

These Polish Jews from Antwerp were all summoned to Mechelen, except for Szmul, 15, who had been ent for forced labour in Northern France, and was subsequently sent to Auschwitz on Transport 16 on 31 October 1942.

The Pioro-Fajwelewicz family

The Pioro-Fajwelewicz family

This entire family of Polish Jews was deported, the majority of them on Transport 10.

Hanna Karpowitz

Hanna Karpowitz

Hanna Karpowitz, 16 years old, was the first person to escape from a transport bound for Auschwitz and was the only person to escape from transport 1.

The Wolf-Marinower family

The Wolf-Marinower family

Renée, 5, and Nathan, 3, were arrested in the night of 15-16 September 1942 in their home at 189 Kroonstraat, during the last of the great raids in Antwerp.

Henry Rappaport

Henry Rappaport

An Austrian Jew who came to Belgium in 1932 and lived in Antwerp at 49 Somersstraat.

The Sztokfisz family

The Sztokfisz family

The boy was 13 in August 1942, his mother 38. There were three other children, Isaac, 2, Oskar, 8, old and Charlotte, 10, in this family of Polish Jews.

Etela Lovi and her children

Etela Lovi and her children

Etela Lovi’s two sons were born in Antwerp, the oldest, Frans in 1931, the youngest, Jackie, in 1933. All three were arrested in Antwerp the day before the first raid on 15 August 1942.

Dora Lustig

Dora Lustig

Dora Lustig, a Polish Jewish tailor, emigrated from Sweden in 1918 and settled in Antwerp.

Alfred Israel Rosendahl

Alfred Israel Rosendahl

Alfred Israel Rosendahl was a German Jewish refugee. Expelled from Germany in 1939, he settled in Antwerp.

The Ginger family

The Ginger family

Aged 15 the day Transport 3 left on 15 August 1942, Mojsesz Icehek was summoned to the Dossin Barracks for work service, as was his 20-year-old sister, Estera Frymeta.

Rywka Rajsbaum and her daughter Mirjam Rosenblum

Rywka Rajsbaum and her daughter Mirjam Rosenblum

These Polish Jews were 36 and 13 years old respectively when they were deported.

Couple Reiss-Levin

Couple Reiss-Levin

These German refugees are thought to have escaped from Holland, where a programme of mass deportation had been started earlier.

The Fligelman-Zentkowski family

The Fligelman-Zentkowski family

Gerszen Fligelman was the first to emigrate from Poland in 1930. His wife, Szejra Zentkowski, and their sons, Abraham and Samuel, joined him a year later.

Erika Pichler, ca. 1938, her older sister Minna, her mother Adela Unger and her father Israel Pichler

The Pichler-Unger family

This family of Austrian German Jews had settled in Schaerbeek, near Brussels, in July 1938.

The Nissim-Algava family

The Nissim-Algava family

The Nissims, a family of Jews, emigrated from Salonika in 1930 and settled in Mons.

Malka Sobel and her son Saul Hirschberger

Malka Sobel and her son Saul Hirschberger

Polish Jews living in Antwerp, Saul Hirschberger and his mother, Malka Sobel were summoned to the Dossin Barracks on 27 August 1942.

Natan Ramet

Natan Ramet

Natan Ramet was born in Warsaw on 5 June 1925. Natan and his father were deported on Transport VI on 29 August 1942. The transport stopped in Kosel, before Auschwitz, where the men were disembarked to be deployed as forced labourers.

The Moskal family

The Moskal family

These Polish Jews lived at 131 Lange Kievitstraat, the street that was the most affected by the first night raid in Antwerp.

Chuma Miara and Freyda Miara

Chuma Miara and Freyda Miara

These two Polish Jewish sisters lived in Antwerp-Berchem, at 126 Gitschotellei.

The Perelman-Rosenberg family

The Perelman-Rosenberg family

Chana Malka Perelman, 15 years old, accompanied her parents to the Dossin Barracks.

The Topor family

The Topor family

The Sipo-SD summoned the father, 41, the mother, 48, Szmul Herszek, 17, and even the youngest, Isidor, 12, to the Dossin Sammellager on the 17th of August.

The Skarbek family

The Skarbek family

These Polish Jews from Antwerp, Jules Skarbek, 3, and his mother, Esther Freude Pech, housewife, 38 , were arrested on 25 August.

The Minz-Zucker family

The Minz-Zucker family

This family of Palestinian Jews lived in the Antwerp suburb of Borgerhout. Transport 7 of 1 September brought them to Auschwitz-Birkenau.

The Gunsberg-Bernstein family

The Gunsberg-Bernstein family

These Polish Jewish refugees who came from Vienna in 1939, Jakob Gunsberg, his wife Reizel Bernstein and their son Gideon lived in Korte Van Ruusbroeckstraat.

The Fischler-Hollander family

The Fischler-Hollander family

Mojzecs Fischler and his family, his wife Serka Hollander, 44, his oldest daughter Sonia Laja, 20, the youngest Beila Ruchla, 13, Munisz, 12, and Jozef, 8, were taken to Mechelen on 29 August 1942.

The Vos-Nabarro family

The Vos-Nabarro family

These Dutch Jews from Antwerp, Emilius Vos, a 31-year-old diamond worker, Rebecca Nabarro, 28 and their children lived in what was called the Jewish quarter, which lay within the bounds of the second great nighttime raid organized in Antwerp.

Adeline Rajzner and Chana Blima Frydman

Adeline Rajzner and Chana Blima Frydman

Adeline Rajzner, 4, was interned in the Dossin Barracks on 4 September 1942, with her mother, Chana Blima Frydman, 27, a milliner who emigrated from Poland in 1920.

The Helman-Kubowitski family

The Helman-Kubowitski family

Born in Poland, Anna Kubowitski arrived in Belgium in 1908, whereas Joseph Helman arrived in 1916. They lived in Saint-Gilles, a commune of Brussels.

Moïse Glickmann

Moïse Glickmann

Moïse Glickmann, a Polish Jew who emigrated from Switzerland in 1928, and a hawker by profession, lived in the Rue de Nancy in the heart of the Jewish quarter of Brussels.

The Gelernter-Rubinstein family and the Czesner-Kroze family

The Gelernter-Rubinstein family and the Czesner-Kroze family

Religious orthodox Jews, with their beards and ringlets, the visible signs of their faith, were a favourite target of the Sammellager SS.

The Kac-Charenzowska family

The Kac-Charenzowska family

The Kac-Charenzowskas lived on Rue de Nancy in Brussels.

The families Szwarcbort-Skoczylas and Lewkowicz-Szmulewicz

The families Szwarcbort-Skoczylas and Lewkowicz-Szmulewicz

Malka Chaja Skoczylas, was a Polish Jew. She lived alone with her three children at 44 Rue de Mérode in Brussels. Another family of Polish Jews lived in the same house. These were Abram Lewkowicz, his wife, their daughter and their son.

Ozyasz Schmidt and Helena Lea Lamm

Ozyasz Schmidt and Helena Lea Lamm

Ozyasz Schmidt, a 32-year-old diamond cleaver, and Helena Lea Lamm, a 28-year-old PE teacher, married in 1938, were both of Polish Jewish origin and had come to Belgium before the First World War.

Malka Zimetbaum

Malka Zimetbaum

Malka Zimetbaum, a 22-year-old Polish Jew, was a pattern cutter by profession. She lived on Marinistraat, in the Jewish quarter of Borgerhout in Antwerp. The street was at the heart of the third great raid in Antwerp, on 11 and 12 September 1942.

Benjamin Reichman and Itta Grunspan

Benjamin Reichman and Itta Grunspan

Benjamin Reichman, 34, shopkeeper, was a Jewish immigrant from Romania. His wife, Itta Grunspan, 35, and housewife, came from Poland. The couple lived at 86 Plantin Moretuslei in the Borgerhout borough of Antwerp.

The Wiezel-Dreiman family

The Wiezel-Dreiman family

Avram Wiezel, 37, was a furrier, while Sari Dreiman, 37, kept house. The couple had three children, two of whom were born in Romania, Michael, 16, and Herman, 14. The youngest, Etta, was born in Antwerp in 1929.

The Morgenstein-Szymkowicz family

The Morgenstein-Szymkowicz family

Deported on Transport 10 on 15 September, this family of seven disappeared without trace.

The Peterfreund-Schlachet family

The Peterfreund-Schlachet family

There were seven members of the Peterfreund-Schlachet family. The father, Moses Leib Peterfreund, arrived in 1932 from Nowy Sacz in Poland. Four years later, his wife, Sara Schlachet, and their first three children, all born in Nowy Sacz, joined him in Antwerp.

Leopold Englander and Sarolta Rosenwasser

Leopold Englander and Sarolta Rosenwasser

Jews of Romanian origin who had sought refuge in Austria in 1939, Leopold Englander was 73, and Sarolta Rosenwasser, 66.

The Sztejnberg-Helman family

The Sztejnberg-Helman family

Mendel Majer Sztejnberg, a young Jew from Kaluszyn in Poland, travelled to the West alone. He settled in Brussels in 1920. He worked as a cobbler in shoe repair shops all over the capital.

The Fingherman family

The Fingherman family

Born in Romania Mosché Fingherman, 40, was a shopkeeper who lived on Plantin Moretuslei in Borgerhout in Antwerp. His wife, Rosa Obrijan, 42, was also a Romanian Jew. All their children were born in Antwerp.

The Grycman-Berkowicz family

The Grycman-Berkowicz family

The Grycman-Berkowicz family had five members. They arrived in the Dossin Barracks on 5 October, but only stayed there for five days, as they were put on board Transport 12, which left Mechelen on 10 October.

Mordka Stainfeld

Mordka Stainfeld

Mordka Stainfeld, a Jew from Warsaw, arrived in Belgium in 1890.

The Schönberg-Ubersfeld family

The Schönberg-Ubersfeld family

Abraham Hirchel Schönberg was born in Oswiecim, a town in Upper Silesia which will forever be known by its German name: Auschwitz. Victoria Ubersfeld was born some sixty kilometres away in Krakow.

The Inowlocki-Mandel family

The Inowlocki-Mandel family

Abram Inowlocki and his wife, Elisabeth Mandel, emigrated from Poland to Belgium in 1937. As relatively late arrivals they were affected by the regulations in effect in 1940-1941, which forced them to live in the Province of Limburg.

The Waksdrykier family

The Waksdrykier family

Pinchos Waksdrykier, a Polish Jew, emigrated from Warsaw with his family in 1938.

Chaja Kluger

Chaja Kluger

The Steinfeld-Klugers were Polish Jews who emigrated before the First World War, in 1912. They settled in Antwerp.

The Weinberger-Frank family

The Weinberger-Frank family

The Weinberger-Franks, a family of Polish Jews, settled in Antwerp.

The Nagiel-Amtmann family

The Nagiel-Amtmann family

The Nagiel-Amtmann family had four members: the father, Elja Noech Nagiel, the mother, Margula Amtmann, and their two children, Joseph, born in Antwerp in 1940 before the invasion, and Félix, born in 1941 in Etterbeek, a borough of Brussels.

Aron Wahl

Aron Wahl

Aron Wahl, a Polish Jew, arrived in 1924 from Hanover in Germany.

Jacob Osias Klapholz

Jacob Osias Klapholz

Jacob Osias Klapholz, a German Jew, emigrated in 1926. He settled in Antwerp.

The Wolfowicz family

The Wolfowicz family

Pessa Wolfowicz and Moses Händel were Polish Jews living in Vienna, where they married in 1932. Towards the end of 1937 they emigrated to Antwerp before the Anschluss of Austria.

The Potaszewicz family

The Potaszewicz family

Szmul Potaszewicz, a Polish Jew, arrived in Belgium in 1923. Marie Zawadzka joined him a year later. In 1925, their daughter, Juliette, was born in Charleroi.

The Brand family

The Brand family

Baruch Brand and his wife, Ita Berger, were Polish Jews who had settled in Antwerp. Their daughter, Augusta Suzanna, was born in December 1938.

The Glassner family

The Glassner family

Salomon Glassner emigrated from Poland in 1920 and his future wife, Chana Buksbaum, followed in 1931. Their son, David, was born in Antwerp at the end of 1931.

The Guttmann-Rozenberg family

The Guttmann-Rozenberg family

Samuel and Juda Guttmann were born in Antwerp, Samuel in 1934, and Juda in 1932. Their mother, Gizela Rozenberg, emigrated from Romania in 1923, and their father, Ernö Guttmann, from Hungary in 1927.

The Wekselman family

The Wekselman family

Moise Wekselman was a Polish Jew and arrived in Belgium in 1919, just after the First World War. Malka Altman left Poland in 1922 and settled in Antwerp, where their children were born: Juliette in 1927 and Alice in 1930.

Willy Rajzner and Rywka Fibich

Willy Rajzner and Rywka Fibich

Rywka Fibich, a housewife, and her husband, Willy Rajzner, a mechanic, lived in Brussels on the outskirts of the Jewish quarter.

The Goldberg family

The Goldberg family

Mayer Goldberg and his wife, Malka, née Goldberg, and their 24-year-old son, Bernhard, emigrated from Mannheim in Germany in 1929. As for Rosa Kardimann, she emigrated from Ludwigshafen in 1933.

Chana Scheiner

Chana Scheiner

Chana Scheiner, a Polish Jew, emigrated from Switzerland to Belgium in 1934. Her daughter, Dora, and her son, Mozes, were both born in Antwerp, the first in 1935 and the second in 1939.

The Keller-Stammler family

The Keller-Stammler family

Leser Keller, was a Polish Jew who had emigrated from Holland in 1920. Sara Stammler arrived two years later. Their three children were born in Antwerp.

The Kaminer family

The Kaminer family

A Polish Jew, Rojla Borensztajn, was the first to emigrate to Belgium. In 1929, she settled in Antwerp. Feivel Kaminer arrived from Poland in 1933.

Majer Tabakman and Rosa Kibel

Majer Tabakman and Rosa Kibel

Majer Tabakman emigrated from Poland in 1928 and settled in Saint-Gilles, a commune of Brussels, where he worked as a clicker (shoe leather cutter). Rosa Kibel arrived from Poland in 1931.

The Klein-Leszczynski family

The Klein-Leszczynski family

Both Polish Jews, Israel Klein, who emigrated in 1928, and Laja Leszczynski in 1931, were both from Berlin. Their son, Alfons, was born in Antwerp in 1932.

The Haber-Löw family

The Haber-Löw family

Sender Haber, Frimet Löw and their daughter, Sonja, were Polish Jews who emigrated from Switzerland in 1932. Their son, Salo, was born in Antwerp.

Helene Zylberszac

Helene Zylberszac

Helene Zylberszac, a Polish Jew, was born in Anderlecht, a borough of Brussels, in 1927. She was arrested in January 1943, and was sent to the Dossin Barracks on the 16th.

Walter Roseboom

Walter Roseboom

Walter Roseboom, a German Jew, was a cattle trader and farmer who came from Leers to Brussels in 1939, shortly before the beginning of the war.

The Turner-Bram family

The Turner-Bram family

Fela Bram, a Polish Jew, emigrated to Belgium in 1926 and settled in Antwerp. As for Szyja Turner, he came from Paris to Antwerp in 1932, where he worked as a leather worker.

The Lipschitz family

The Lipschitz family

Although Polish in origin Rachel Mandel recta Kwadrat and Israel Isaak Lipschitz were second generation immigrants. They were both born in Antwerp.

Alexandre Pinkus

Alexandre Pinkus

Alexandre Pinkus, a Polish Jew, was a chemical engineer and doctor in physical sciences, and a graduate of Paris and Geneva.

The Gruszow family

The Gruszow family

Feiwel Gruszow, a diamond worker, emigrated from Poland in 1909, and Ilse Oppenheimer from Germany in 1928.

Frima Czipis

Frima Czipis

Polish Jews with Belgian nationality, Frima Czipis and her two sons, Jacques, born in Liège in 1920, and Simon Likvermann, born in Brussels in 1935, were arrested at their home during Aktion Iltis.

The Tumarkin-Lewin family

The Tumarkin-Lewin family

Born in Antwerp, Bernard Tumarkin worked as a diamond broker in the city. His wife, Esther Lewin, emigrated from Poland in 1910, and acquired Belgian nationality through her marriage.

Dora Hackena

Dora Hackena

A Belgian Jew, Dora Hackena, was born in Ostend and gave birth to Clarisse in Antwerp on 6 June 1941.

Zelman Ungerowicz

Zelman Ungerowicz

A Polish Jew, Zelman Ungerowicz, emigrated in 1925 with his parents. They settled in the Liège region, first at Seraing, and then in Liège.

Simon Guterman

Simon Guterman

Simon Guterman was born in Brussels in 1916, while his wife, Liba Bywalska, emigrated from Poland in 1922. A Jew of Belgian nationality he served in the Eighteen Day Campaign.

The Lachman family

The Lachman family

David Lachman, a Polish Jew, came to Belgium in 1929 at the age of 6 with his father, Berck, his mother, Garna Kozak, and younger brother, Michal Icchok, who was 3 at the time.

The Chapochnik-Zimmerman family

The Chapochnik-Zimmerman family

The Chapochnik-Zimmerman family emigrated from Romania between 1920 and 1922. Their names were entered in the register of Jews at the end of 1940.

Maxime and Miryam Seyffers

Maxime and Miryam Seyffers

Following their arrest in June 1944, the family was taken to the Dossin Barracks on 21 June, and were immediately put down for Transport 26, the last transport from Belgium.

Nathan Kornweitz

Nathan Kornweitz

Nathan Kornweitz was a Jewish refugee from the Reich. Expelled from Austria in 1938, he settled in Schaerbeek, a borough of Brussels.