Overlevenden

Max Lanes

Max Lanes

Max Lanes stayed briefly in the Dossin Barracks, but was transferred to the prison at Saint-Gilles. He was deported from there to Auschwitz-Birkenau. As a result, his name does not appear on the transport lists. His brothers Arthur and Gustav were deported from the Dossin Barracks.


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Family Dunkelblau-Schwarz

Family Dunkelblau-Schwarz

Mejlech Dunkelblau and Ryfka Schwarz were both born in Rzeszów, Poland. Anna Dunkelblau was born on November 15, 1906. Mejlech and Ryfka lived unofficially separated. Mejlech was deported on transport XXIV from the Dossin Barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau and was murdered there. Ryfka and Anna were not deported and survived the war.

Louis Alexander and Elisabeth Nykerk

Louis Alexander and Elisabeth Nykerk

Louis Alexander fled Germany in 1934. He married Elisabeth Nykerk in Schaerbeek on August 6, 1938. Louis was arrested in 1940 and deported to Perpignan in France. After his release, he was arrested again and deported with transport XXIV. Louis died in 1945 in Theresienstadt. Elisabeth presumably stayed in the Netherlands and survived.

Family Wahl-Keller

Family Wahl-Keller

The whole Wahl-Keller family, except from father Seinwel Hersz Wahl and daughter Lea, was deported from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. No one survived the deportation. Seinwel survived the war but died already in 1946.

Family Rosen-Hochglober

Family Rosen-Hochglober

This family was strongly affected by the horrors of the Second World War.

Lotte Sontag

Lotte Sontag

Lotte joined the communist resistance to destabilise the Wehrmacht.

Hertha Ligeti

Hertha Ligeti

Hertha Ligeti joined the communist resistance to destabilise the Wehrmacht.

Family Borenchole-Landsberg

Family Borenchole-Landsberg

The Borenchole-Landsberg family was deported with transport XX from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Mother Fejga and daughter Thérèse were murdered. Their son, Salomon, was not deported and survived the war. Father Abraham Joseph survived his captivity in Auschwitz and came back to Belgium in 1945, together with Salomon.

Family Margulies-Mahler

Family Margulies-Mahler

The Margulies-Mahler family obtained the naturalization in 1926 which granted them Belgian citizenship. Anne, Jacques, Helena-Ella, Liliane and Armand were deported with transport XXIIB to Auschwitz-Birkenau. They were murdered. Georges Mahler went into hiding in Aarschot with his wife Selma Lichtmann and children Charles and Nanette. They were never arrested and survived World War II.

Resistance fighter Szmul Zanvel Wolman

Resistance fighter Szmul Zanvel Wolman

The story of how a Polish representative of Belgian companies became a member of the resistance. Szmul spent time in many different camps, but managed to escape several times.

The couple Szyper-Prowisor

The couple Szyper-Prowisor

The couple escaped the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. A recent testimony provides the reconstruction of their incredible life story.

Family Sztainke-Zandlowicz

Family Sztainke-Zandlowicz

Thanks to the kind women Balthus and Allard, the children are able to go into hiding in the Fraiture castle and survive the war.

The Pioro-Fajwelewicz family

The Pioro-Fajwelewicz family

This entire family of Polish Jews was deported, the majority of them on Transport 10.

The Wolf-Marinower family

The Wolf-Marinower family

Renée, 5, and Nathan, 3, were arrested in the night of 15-16 September 1942 in their home at 189 Kroonstraat, during the last of the great raids in Antwerp.

Natan Ramet

Natan Ramet

Natan Ramet was born in Warsaw on 5 June 1925. Natan and his father were deported on Transport VI on 29 August 1942. The transport stopped in Kosel, before Auschwitz, where the men were disembarked to be deployed as forced labourers.

The Topor family

The Topor family

The Sipo-SD summoned the father, 41, the mother, 48, Szmul Herszek, 17, and even the youngest, Isidor, 12, to the Dossin Sammellager on the 17th of August.

The Vos-Nabarro family

The Vos-Nabarro family

These Dutch Jews from Antwerp, Emilius Vos, a 31-year-old diamond worker, Rebecca Nabarro, 28 and their children lived in what was called the Jewish quarter, which lay within the bounds of the second great nighttime raid organized in Antwerp.

Leon Rotstein

Leon Rotstein

Leon Rotsein, a Russian Jew, who emmigrated in 1929, was arrested in Charleroi, where he lived, on 7 August 1941.

The Sztejnberg-Helman family

The Sztejnberg-Helman family

Mendel Majer Sztejnberg, a young Jew from Kaluszyn in Poland, travelled to the West alone. He settled in Brussels in 1920. He worked as a cobbler in shoe repair shops all over the capital.

The Fingherman family

The Fingherman family

Born in Romania Mosché Fingherman, 40, was a shopkeeper who lived on Plantin Moretuslei in Borgerhout in Antwerp. His wife, Rosa Obrijan, 42, was also a Romanian Jew. All their children were born in Antwerp.

The Grycman-Berkowicz family

The Grycman-Berkowicz family

The Grycman-Berkowicz family had five members. They arrived in the Dossin Barracks on 5 October, but only stayed there for five days, as they were put on board Transport 12, which left Mechelen on 10 October.

The Nagiel-Amtmann family

The Nagiel-Amtmann family

The Nagiel-Amtmann family had four members: the father, Elja Noech Nagiel, the mother, Margula Amtmann, and their two children, Joseph, born in Antwerp in 1940 before the invasion, and Félix, born in 1941 in Etterbeek, a borough of Brussels.

The Potaszewicz family

The Potaszewicz family

Szmul Potaszewicz, a Polish Jew, arrived in Belgium in 1923. Marie Zawadzka joined him a year later. In 1925, their daughter, Juliette, was born in Charleroi.

Ludwig Posener

Ludwig Posener

Kurt Friedrich Posener was a German Jew who had sought refuge in Brussels shortly after the Kristallnacht on 9 November 1938. His son, Ludwig, then aged 12, came with him.

The Brand family

The Brand family

Baruch Brand and his wife, Ita Berger, were Polish Jews who had settled in Antwerp. Their daughter, Augusta Suzanna, was born in December 1938.

Szymon Sukiennik

Szymon Sukiennik

Szymon Sukiennik was 6 years old when he arrived in Belgium in 1929 with his parents, Chana Szumilinski and Rafal Sukiennik, and his older sister, Liba.

The Wekselman family

The Wekselman family

Moise Wekselman was a Polish Jew and arrived in Belgium in 1919, just after the First World War. Malka Altman left Poland in 1922 and settled in Antwerp, where their children were born: Juliette in 1927 and Alice in 1930.

Joseph Hakker

Joseph Hakker

Joseph Hakker was a Dutch Jew who arrived in Belgium in 1907 when he was only 20.

Couple Landskroner-Reig

Couple Landskroner-Reig

Berta Landskroner and Leib Reig were Jewish refugees expelled from the Reich in 1939 who settled in Brussels.

Fiszel Abram Lipszyc

Fiszel Abram Lipszyc

Fiszel Abram Lipszyc, a Polish Jew, emigrated in 1929. He married Anna Majlechowitz during the occupation.

The Goldsteinas-Vistinezki family

The Goldsteinas-Vistinezki family

Lithuanian Jews, Mendelis Goldsteinas and Hinda Vistinezki emigrated to Belgium in 1924 and 1925 respectively.

Paul Halter

Paul Halter

Paul Halter was born in Geneva on 10 October 1920. He was just one year old when he came to Belgium with his parents, Jozef Halter and Ryfka Horowitz, both Polish Jews.

The Gruszow family

The Gruszow family

Feiwel Gruszow, a diamond worker, emigrated from Poland in 1909, and Ilse Oppenheimer from Germany in 1928.

Hans Maier

Hans Maier

Hans Maier was an Austrian Jew who had fled to Belgium in 1939. He settled in Brussels. He was arrested as “suspect” on 10 May 1940 by the as yet independent Belgian State.

Rosa Keck

Rosa Keck

Rosa Keck, a Gypsy of German nationality, gave birth to her first two children in Germany, Rudolf, in Deutz, near Cologne, in 1932, and Sophia, in Kreuznach, also near Cologne, in 1935.

Israel Majer Mandelbaum

Israel Majer Mandelbaum

Robert was the ‘nom de guerre’ Israel Majer Mandelbaum used in the Jewish Defence Committee (CDJ). A Jew from Lublin, like his wife Estera Wajnmann, he emigrated to Brussels with her in 1932.

The Lachman family

The Lachman family

David Lachman, a Polish Jew, came to Belgium in 1929 at the age of 6 with his father, Berck, his mother, Garna Kozak, and younger brother, Michal Icchok, who was 3 at the time.

The Chapochnik-Zimmerman family

The Chapochnik-Zimmerman family

The Chapochnik-Zimmerman family emigrated from Romania between 1920 and 1922. Their names were entered in the register of Jews at the end of 1940.